User Profile

Vincent Mousseau

vmousseau@millefeuilles.cloud

Joined 1 year, 4 months ago

Doctorant et travailleur social basé à Tiohtià:ke (Montréal). Profitant d'un mode de vie à l'abri des algorithmes manipulateurs des géants du web.

PhD student and social worker based in Tiohtià:ke (Montréal). Trying to live a life less controlled by the algorithmic manipulation of the tech giants.

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Vincent Mousseau's books

Stopped Reading

2024 Reading Goal

33% complete! Vincent Mousseau has read 8 of 24 books.

Park Cruising (2023, House of Anansi Press) 4 stars

Park Cruising takes a long look at the men who cruise for sex in urban 


Park cruising is an outlet for guys — whether they're racialized, closeted, religious, married, or none of the above - and we need to recognize that. In such circum-stances, parks are often one of the few release points for pent-up desire. Providing such a release is a social good, one we should be wary of trying to deny to men who, for whatever reason, don't feel comfortable interacting with other aspects of queer life.

Park Cruising by  (Page 207)

Park Cruising (2023, House of Anansi Press) 4 stars

Park Cruising takes a long look at the men who cruise for sex in urban 


But I don't want to overemphasize that. Racialized men who are out and proud often don't feel comfortable participating in queer life in bars and nightclubs not because of shame but for another perfectly obvious reason: gay spaces reproduce racism in extremely pointed ways. The physical spaces, advertising, programming on the TVs, staffing choices, and sexual tastes of customers favour young, white, able-bodied guys. Casual racism and open hostility are so common for queer people of colour in these places that it's no wonder people seek out alternatives in the parks and bushes. When we assume that racialized queer people are less liberated than white queers, we are often projecting our own "residual, unac-knowledged shame" onto brown bodies, as academic Sally Munt points out.

Park Cruising by  (Page 206 - 207)

Park Cruising (2023, House of Anansi Press) 4 stars

Park Cruising takes a long look at the men who cruise for sex in urban 


Instead, shame is something we do with, for, and against other people. Sedgwick writes that shame is "relational." And not just that, but it's useful. The way Sedgwick tells it, shame "permanently intensifies or alters the meaning of" what it attaches to. And she sees this especially at work in many of the touchstones of queer and trans culture. If Sedgwick is right, then shame isn't something to run and hide from. It's not something to be cured. It's just a part of the experiences that make us who we are. Sedgwick sums it up this way, in one of my favourite metaphors in the literature of queer feeling: "Shame and pride, shame and dignity, shame and self-display, shame and exhibitionism are different interlinings of the same glove."

Park Cruising by  (Page 202 - 203)

Park Cruising (2023, House of Anansi Press) 4 stars

Park Cruising takes a long look at the men who cruise for sex in urban 


Stumbling on something unexpected is one of the great joys of living in a city — heck, of living anywhere near other people. It starts raining, you duck into a restaurant, and it becomes your new favourite place to eat. You stumble into a concert in a park, and it becomes a highlight of your summer. It's not that all accidents are happy, or that all surprises are good, but we don't know how something will affect us until after we've experienced it.

Park Cruising by  (Page 46)

Killing Rage (Paperback, 1996, H. Holt and Co.) No rating

More than two decades before Black Lives Matter and the #MeToo movement roiled America, bell 


We experience the world as infinitely less hostile to blackness than it actually is. This shift happens particularly as we buy into liberal individualism and see our individual fate as black people in no way linked to the collective fate. It is that link that sustains full awareness of the daily impact of racism on black people, particularly its hostile and brutal assaults.

Killing Rage by  (Page 17)

Killing Rage (Paperback, 1996, H. Holt and Co.) No rating

More than two decades before Black Lives Matter and the #MeToo movement roiled America, bell 


Confronting my rage, witnessing the way it moved me to grow and change, I understood intimately that it had the potential not only to destroy but also to construct. Then and now I understand rage to be a necessary aspect of resistance struggle. Rage can act as a catalyst inspiring courageous ac-tion. By demanding that black people repress and annihilate our rage to assimilate, to reap the benefits of material privilege in white supremacist capitalist patriarchal culture, white folks urge us to remain complicit with their efforts to colonize, oppress, and exploit.

Killing Rage by  (Page 16)